Posted on April 21st, 2018 in Information | No Comments »

…And why our therapy dogs are not fed them

Raw protein diets have started to gain some traction in the pet food industry and among dog owners.  Some proponents feel that raw diets are healthier for dogs, though there has not been any peer-reviewed study proving this claim. However, there have been studies showing that feeding dogs raw protein diets can be a risk to human health, especially to those people who have compromised immune systems.

Raw protein diets can be contaminated with harmful bacteria, such as E. coli, Samonella, Campylobacter, and Listeria. Since the meat is raw, it is not cooked or processed in ways to kill these bacteria that may be present in the meat. Some dogs may get sick and have nausea or vomiting, soft stool or diarrhea, or even get an infection in their blood stream. For other dogs, they may not get sick, but could become asymptomatic carriers of the bacteria. This means, they could transmit the bacteria to people, either by licking them, or simply by the person coming into contact with their fur. These types of bacteria can make people extremely sick, and can even cause death, especially among susceptible children.

Because our therapy dogs frequently encounter people who may not have strong immune systems, such as children and the elderly, we cannot allow our therapy dogs to be fed raw protein diets. We do not want to put the people we are helping at risk for a deadly infection, no matter what the odds are.

Most veterinarians advise against feeding a raw food diet because of these public health risks.

Most types of “raw food” are prepared when the pet owner buys raw meat and bone and feeds it directly to their pet. There are also commercially available “raw protein diets”. However, there are some raw foods that we may not be aware of that could potentially cause harm, and these include the following:

  • Pig ears
  • Bully sticks
  • Antlers
  • Marrow bones
  • Raw coated kibble
  • Freeze-dried raw food
  • Dried liver bites

**For this article, when we refer to raw, we only refer to raw meat and bone, not raw vegetables, since those are usually fine as long as they are washed off first.

References and where to find more information:

https://www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Pages/Raw-or-Undercooked-Animal-Source-Protein-in-Cat-and-Dog-Diets.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3003575/

http://vet.tufts.edu/wp-content/uploads/raw_meat_diets_memo.pdf

https://www.aaha.org/professional/resources/raw_protein_diet.aspx


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